Category Archives: art

Xaviera Simmons: junctures

OFF/SITE: Xaviera Simmons: junctures (transmissions to) at the Goethe-Institut Wyoming Building

Although this show is now over, it was a great show to experience after our discussion on technology a couple of Mondays ago.   About being private, yet someone public.

“Over five weeks of junctures (transmissions to), Xaviera Simmons will engage invited writers, academics, musicians, astrologers and others in a series of “micro-residencies,” embracing the collaborative and multi-genre nature of the OFF/SITE project. Participants including artist Brendan Fernandes, filmmaker Sophie Hamacher, landscape architect and surfer Benjamin Landers, singer/songwriter Austin McCutchen, and historian and singer Teresa Mora will join Simmons in a closed, site-specific wooden studio structure within the Wyoming Building. The studio will be equipped with a slide projector, digital projector, microphone, amplification system and commercial-grade copy machine; the gallery will serve as home to several live finches for the duration of the project. In the gallery, the artist and her collaborators will create an ever-changing installation of photocopies, projections, staged readings, sound recordings and ephemera reflecting the conversations and activity within the studio.”

Racini A.

High Tech Versus No Tech

This weekend was a perfect time to ponder the idea of high tech versus no tech within museum walls, as I had the chance to visit two wonderful museums which represented both extremes.

The First was a trip to The Waterfront Museum in Red Hook (Brooklyn) (please watch this video, it’s adorable.) The Museum has a very unique characteristic: it is actually a floating barge, and the only one in New York to be exact. I accompanied a friend to sit in on a third grade’s class visit to the museum. 70 eight year olds filled the barge to learn about its history, as well as the history of transportation in the US and specifically in New York. There space was bare except for some paintings on the walls an old fashioned domino effect machine, and a juggling curator named David Sharps.

The children were completely engaged by his class lecture, excitedly participating with their museum educator. At one point, he used the term “obsolete” to describe the old purpose of the barge, and explain how he created a new purpose for it, (by turning it into a museum.) I started to think about the word in terms of our discussion about the ‘no tech’ museum. Are they obsolete as well or can we still find a use for them within our society? By the enthusiasm and smiles on the children’s face. I was reassured that there was still in fact a great need for a museum which focuses on the rudimentary values of social interaction and energetic education.

On the other side of the spectrum, there was the “YouTube Play” exhibit at the Guggenheim. An Asian blog described the event: “The Guggenheim Museum last week unveiled the winners of a video contest submitted via YouTube from artists around the world. The top 25 videos selected in the ‘You Tube Play’ competition were shown for the first time on a large screen at New York City’s Guggenheim. The contest, created with video-sharing web site YouTube, was aimed at showcasing innovative online video artists. The videos were projected onto the exterior of the museum’s rotunda in Manhattan.Varying from animated line drawings to cartoons, the top 25 videos were created by 39 artists from 14 countries” (NTDTV). Here’s a video of the spectacular exhibition. While I was not able to make it to the event itself, just watching the event online was a breathtaking site to see. Youtube is one of the quintessential examples of technology and when used appropriately, can create beautifully crafted artwork.

In both cases, I think that the choice to use or not use technology was done appropriately, based on the content and aesthetic that the museum wished to convey.  The Waterfront Museum proved to me that technology was not necessary in order to create an entertaining and educational exhibit, while the Guggenheim reassured me that the use of technology could be done tastefully and successfully.  The question does not seem to be “high tech versus no tech” but rather “how will this tech” bring value to the museum.

J Peterson

The Record Exhibit at The Nasher Museum

The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl This exhibition is, as their website states: ” a groundbreaking exhibition that explores the culture of vinyl records through 50 years of contemporary art. [It] features work by 41 artists from around the world, (including christian marclay robin rhodelaurie anderson and david byrne, to name a few) from the 1960s to the present, who use vinyl records as subject or medium. The exhibition includes sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, painting, photography, video and performance.”

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Besides the fact that I happen to be a fan and collector of the LP, I also find it interesting to view new ways in which artists can manipulate common goods of popular culture into a new collection of art (which ironically, tends to result in art of counter culture, or at least aspires to do so.) Whether it be kitchenware, old toys, or disposed trash (as we’ve seen and read in class), the use of everyday items can recall feelings of nostalgia for many visitors, and create a unique experience for each patron. YouTube video.

J Peterson

Yoko Ono: Voice Piece for Soprano…

Say what you will about Yoko Ono (I happen to love her).

The more I think about how there are more museums than ever, and less objects in these museums than ever; I begin to do a run through in my head of exhibitions with very few objects and how, subjectively, successful I find them.  Probably the most recent [basically] non-object piece/exhibit I’ve seen is Ono’s “Voice Piece for Soprano” at MoMA.  The piece is made of a large empty room, very little directional wall text, a microphone on a stand in the center of the room which is flanked by two speakers, and you–the participant.  I spent almost two hours on a Saturday sitting in front of the piece; watching countless elderly women hobble up to the mic and scream at the top of their lungs.  It was really intense.  I keep thinking about this piece in relation to the reading from last week, which explained the various reasons people choose to participate or not to participate.  My thought is that Ono’s piece offers an ideal model for a participatory piece because it is straightforward.  “Scream“.  It is easy to do, and not screaming makes you look like a weirdo.  Everyone is doing it (perhaps participatory museums should rely more on peer pressure).  Also, it feels amazing to get to scream at the top of your lungs.

Logan Sibrel

Museum of Everything

Museum of Everything 
at “No Soul For Sale" photo Tate PhotographyWith its rather ambitious name, The Museum of Everything provides an interesting take on the idea that anyone can contribute to a museum collection. It claims to be “the only international space dedicated to untrained, unintentional and unseen creators” of today.

The first Museum of Everything exhibition included over 800 drawings, paintings, sculptures and installations, chosen by well known artists and curators and was presented during the Frieze Art Fair in London this time last year. Their second exhibition, which I had the pleasure of visiting, was at the Tate Modern during their 10th Anniversary and  ‘No Soul For Sale: A Festival of Independents’. In asking previously unexhibited and unknown artists of Greater Britain to bring their work to be selected, curated and displayed they created what could be seen as the ultimate  participatory museum experience: the creations of the ‘ordinary visitor’ became the collection in a context renowned for exhibiting the worlds most famous artists. For Exhibition #3, their new show which has just opened in London the idea of non-traditional art is extended. The show is curated in collaboration with Sir Peter Blake, a British pop artist and a collector whose collections of self-taught art, found objects and anonymous artefacts inspire his own work.

The Museum of Everything is an interesting exploration of not only of the participatory experience but also the temporary, mobile and collaborative potential of the museum.

RH

Participation & Technology

I made a comment on Monday about how I’m concerned about the overuse of technology in today’s museums, so I decided to try some further research to get a better idea of positive aspects of participatory technology.  I came up with this interesting article about a study of the Sotto Voce audio guide done in 2002.  The guide attempts to solve the problem of disconnected visitors who use headphone tours in art museums. The program acts as a connector between visitors and as a personalized tour guide.  For the full article: Revisiting the Visit

Michelle Jackson

Steven Conn Podcast

Here is a podcast interview with Steven Conn, who we read in class this week. The conversation is based around his book “Do We Still Need Objects?” and its pretty interesting to hear his views. I thought that some of the class might enjoy hearing more about his thoughts.

Jess Petersen